Family benefits public spending

Related topics

Family benefits spending refer to public spending on family benefits, including financial support that is exclusively for families and children. Spending recorded in other social policy areas, such as health and housing, also assist families, but not exclusively, and it is not included in this indicator. Broadly speaking there are three types of public spending on family benefits: Child-related cash transfers (cash benefits) to families with children, including child allowances, with payment levels that in some countries vary with the age of the child, and sometimes are income-tested; public income support payments during periods of parental leave and income support for sole parents families. Public spending on services for families (benefits in kind) with children, including direct financing and subsidising of providers of childcare and early education facilities, public childcare support through earmarked payments to parents, public spending on assistance for young people and residential facilities, public spending on family services, including centre-based facilities and home help services for families in need. Financial support for families provided through the tax system, including tax exemptions (e.g. income from child benefits that is not included in the tax base); child tax allowances (amounts for children that are deducted from gross income and are not included in taxable income), and child tax credits, amounts that are deducted from the tax liability. This indicator is broken down by cash benefits and benefits in king and is measured in percentage of GDP.

Family benefits public spending

Perspectives

Countries

Time

Definition of
Family benefits public spending

Family benefits spending refer to public spending on family benefits, including financial support that is exclusively for families and children. Spending recorded in other social policy areas, such as health and housing, also assist families, but not exclusively, and it is not included in this indicator. Broadly speaking there are three types of public spending on family benefits:
Child-related cash transfers (cash benefits) to families with children, including child allowances, with payment levels that in some countries vary with the age of the child, and sometimes are income-tested; public income support payments during periods of parental leave and income support for sole parents families.
Public spending on services for families (benefits in kind) with children, including direct financing and subsidising of providers of childcare and early education facilities, public childcare support through earmarked payments to parents, public spending on assistance for young people and residential facilities, public spending on family services, including centre-based facilities and home help services for families in need.
Financial support for families provided through the tax system, including tax exemptions (e.g. income from child benefits that is not included in the tax base); child tax allowances (amounts for children that are deducted from gross income and are not included in taxable income), and child tax credits, amounts that are deducted from the tax liability.
This indicator is broken down by cash benefits and benefits in king and is measured in percentage of GDP.

Citation

Please cite this indicator as follows:

Further indicators related to Social protection

Further publications related to Social protection

Sharing options

Permanent URL

Copy the URL to open this chart with all your selections.

Embed code

Use this code to embed the visualisation into your website.